Important Honey News

"Antimicrobial activity of honey against food pathogens and food spoilage microorganisms," Cornell University. This study investigated the antimicrobial activity of different types of honey against food pathogens and food spoilage microorganisms. The study showed that certain varieties of honey inhibited the growth of these organisms. Thus, incorporating some varieties of honey into foods could enhance the safety and shelf life of the products without the use of chemical preservatives. (to read the the full version of this research click here.)

"Buckwheat honey, a natural sweetener, conveys antioxidant protection to healthy human subjects," University of California at Davis. Antimutagenic effect of honeys against Trp-p-1 Free Radicals have been implicated in aging and many diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Antioxidants in the human diet protect us from some of this damage. The study found that antioxidant compounds in Buckwheat honey could provide some level of antioxidant protection. Since more than 150 pounds of sugar are consumed annually by each U.S. citizen, this investigation suggests that if honey was substituted for sweeteners traditionally  used in food products, it could substantially improve total antioxidant intake by humans. (to read the the full version of this research click here.)

"Antimutagenic effect of honeys against Trp-p-1," University of Illinois at Urbana. Antioxidants often have antimutagenic properties, but nothing was known about honey in this regard. (Antimutagenic compounds interfere with or reduce the effect of harmful changes in cells in the body.) This research shows that honey is antimutagenic, offering yet another reason to use it as an ingredient and in the diet. (to read the the full version of this research click here.)